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Leonard P. Liggio, R.I.P.

On Tuesday, October 14, 2014, Leonard P. Liggio, Distinguished Member and two-time president of The Philadelphia Society, passed from this mortal life into the Eternal realm.

I first met Leonard in the summer of 1990, which I spent as a summer fellow at IHS.  From that time, Leonard has been a “presence” in my life, an ever-ready resource and inspiration.  It has been one of the great blessings of my life to have the opportunity to work with Leonard in a variety of settings to advance the learning of liberty.

We often speak of the “battle for freedom” or the “fight for liberty” in which we are engaged and speak of our colleagues as fellow warriors.  Leonard, however, set the bar higher.  As a Grand Strategist of the cause for liberty, he invited us to climb out of the muddy trenches and to claim higher ground on the foundations of history, philosophy, sound political economy, and theology.  We have lost an officer, a gentleman, and a gentle man of faith who understood and exemplified what freedom is for.

Alex Chafuen posted a tribute to Leonard here.   When you have a moment, please thank Alex and the entire team at Atlas who have cared so lovingly for Leonard in these years when his body could not keep up with his mind and spirit and who have helped his vast movement “family” stay in touch.  Thanks to Alex and his cell phone camera, The Philadelphia Society Board of Trustees was able to sign and send Leonard a letter of good wishes and thanks on behalf of the Society from our meeting last Friday in Grand Rapids.

You can hear Leonard reflecting on the future of the American republic, and getting a big laugh, at the 2006 National Meeting here.

“I will not say, ‘Do not weep’, for not all tears are an evil.” (Gandalf)

With thanksgiving for the life of our friend.



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